Helping the international community
adopt and maintain environmentally sound & sustainable practices.

          LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS         

The Annual International Conference on Soils, Sediments, Water, and Energy is pleased to bestow the Lifetime Achievement Award each year to individuals who have made significant contributions to the understanding and solution of soil, sediment, and groundwater pollution problems. 


2016 Awards

Haim B. Gunner has a B.S.A. from the Ontario Agricultural College and M.Sc. from the University of Manitoba in Soil Microbiology. He was a founding member of Kibbutz Saasa on the Lebanese border of Israel, and became Coordinator of Agricultural and Biological Research at the Research Council of Israel. He completed his doctoral work at Cornell in 1961, then was a research scientist at the Microbiology Research Institute in Ottawa, Canada. Dr. Gunner joined the UMass Amherst in 1963. His research work reflecting his concerns with the environmental impact of pesticides led to the establishment of the Department of Environmental Sciences.

In the early 80’s, he established his own company, EcoScience, to commercialize effective biological agents. Eventually, venture capital infusion, an IPO and listing on NASDAQ were achieved. Professor Gunner has published and lectured widely on biological control and ecosystem balance, and has also sustained an ongoing interest in international development.  He participated in establishing and served as Associate Director for Research in the Center for International Agricultural Studies. He has also served as a consultant to the Israel Parliamentary Committee on the Environment and in the development of the Israel EPA, now the Department of the Environment.  In 1983, he was invited to Viet Nam to participate in a symposium on The Long Term Effects of Chemicals in Warfare and, while there, pursued an examination of the unintended ecological consequences of chemicals applied to the environment. Presently, Dr. Gunner is continuing his exploration of the interactions between microbes, plants, insects, and plant pathogens to harness these relationships, limiting pest species without stressing the environment, as Chief Scientist of the Performance Nutrition Division of LidoChem, Inc.


Richard (Dick) L. Raymond, Sr. is acknowledged by the US EPA as the “grandfather of in-situ bioremediation” in the United States.  During the early 1970’s, while employed by the Sun Oil Company, he developed the microbial and field techniques that are now universally known as the “Raymond Process” for the cleanup of groundwater contaminated with petroleum and petroleum products, a great alternative to the endless and extensive process of “pump and treat.” His 1974 patent for “Reclamation of Hydrocarbon Contaminated Groundwater” provided the basis for the development of the groundwater bioremediation industry that is now a worldwide business. His 1984 patent, “Stimulation of Biooxidation Processes in Subterranean Formations,” developed the use of hydrogen peroxide to overcome limitations in the existing methods for mass transfer of oxygen to groundwater.

Countless books and research articles acknowledge Raymond’s seminal contributions as the inventor of process technology for the in-situ bioremediation of contaminated groundwater. While at Sun Oil Co., Mr. Raymond directed a group of microbiology specialists, and early research activities greatly expanded the scope of biological hydrocarbon oxidations.

Mr. Raymond has received numerous awards for his research over the years including the Society of Industrial Microbiologists Charles Porter Award.  He also served on numerous committees including the API Groundwater Task Force, peer review panel of the Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Laboratory, and the USEPA Valdez Oil Spill Panel. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Microbiology from the University of Illinois-Champaign in 1947 and 1951, respectively.  His college studies were interrupted by World War II, when he served as a B-17 navigator in the European theater.  After graduation, he worked for Socony Mobil Oil Co. and Sun Oil Co. as a Research Microbiologist.   After retiring from Sun Oil Co. in 1982, he founded the first in-situ bioremediation company (Biosystems, Inc.) in the US.  The company was later purchased by the DuPont Company and became DuPont Environmental Remediation Services (DERS).  


2015 Awards


Dominic M. Di Toro is the Edward C. Davis Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Delaware. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineers in February 2005. His other awards include the Institute of Scientific Information Highly Cited Researcher (2003), The Founders Award of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (1997), and a SETAC Fellow in 2014. Dr. Di Toro has specialized in the development and application of mathematical and statistical models to stream, lake, estuarine and coastal water, and sediment quality problems. He has published over one hundred technical papers, as well as Sediment Flux Modeling, published by J. Wiley & Sons. He has participated as Expert Consultant, Principal Investigator and Project Manager on numerous water quality studies for industry, research foundations, and governmental agencies. His work has focused on the development of water and sediment quality criteria, sediment flux models for nutrients and metals, and integrated hydrodynamic, sediment transport and water quality models. His latest research area is developing mechanistic models of metal and organic chemical partitioning and toxicity that can make predictions from the molecular structure only. Dr. Di Toro received his B.E.E. in Electrical Engineering with honors from Manhattan College in 1963, his M.A. in Electrical Engineering in 1965 and his Ph.D. in Civil and Geological Engineering in 1967, both from Princeton University. He joined the faculty of Manhattan College and became the Donald J. O’Connor Professor of Environmental Engineering in 1999. In 2003, he joined the faculty at the University of Delaware. Dr. Di Toro also served as a Senior Research Consulting Engineer at Hydroscience, Inc. from 1969-1980 and was a founding partner of the successor firm HydroQual, Inc, a consulting firm that specializes in water quality modeling, where he was Principal Consultant from 1980 to 2004.





Leigh Short graduated from the University of Michigan in 1963 with a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering. He worked for California Research Corporation (Chevron) from 1962-1967 as a Senior Process Engineer. During that time he received several patents for a new wastewater treatment process which has since been employed in several refineries. From 1967-1979 he was a Professor in the Chemical Engineering Department at UMass Amherst. During this time, he was appointed to NIH’s air pollution panel and in 1976 to the Science Advisory Board (engineering panel) of EPA. From 1979 to “retirement” in 2000 he was employed in the consulting sector working mostly with commercial clients. He was employed by three companies: Environmental Research and Technology (Vice President Engineering), Radian Corporation (Senior Project Manager) and Woodward Clyde Consultants (Vice President, Principal). After retirement from Woodward Clyde he started a small consulting business focusing on litigation support and expert witness assignments. The Company was asked to assist in about twenty separate cases. His consulting assignments focused on selection of remediation technologies, particularly for manufactured gas plants and PCB contaminated sites. He has also served on many EPA review panels for contracts and centers of excellence and has been a member of the NRC panels focused on destruction of chemical weapons. He has served as a consultant to EPA (fugitive emissions from refineries), Arthur D Little (petroleum refining), and SAIC (destruction of chemical weapons containing mercury). While at UMass he chaired the University Academic Policy Committee and was one of the original Directors of the BDIC program.




2014 Awards

Danny D. Reible is the Donovan Maddox Distinguished Engineering Chair at Texas Tech University.  Previously he was the Bettie Margaret Smith Chair of Environmental Health Engineering in the Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering and the Director of the Center for Research in Water Resources at the University of Texas in Austin.  He holds a PhD in Chemical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology.   He is a Board Certified Environmental Engineer, a Professional Engineer (LA) and in 2005 was elected to the National Academy of Engineering for the “development of widely used approaches for the management of contaminated sediments”.  In 2012 he helped found and currently chairs the International Society of Water Solutions, a society focused on industrial water management.    His research is focused on the fate, transport and management of contaminants in the environment and the sustainable management of water resources. Current interests include the assessment of bioavailability of mercury and hydrophobic organics in sediments and their in-situ remediation as well as water management for hydraulic fracturing for shale gas and oil.   He has also evaluated the impacts of coastal flooding, e.g. during hurricanes, on contaminant mobility and availability.  He has authored or edited six books and more than 150 journal articles and book chapters. Research support as a principal investigator has totaled more than $30 million.>/p>



John Teal’s professional career began in the early 1950’s with his Harvard Ph.D. thesis on the trophic relationships in a tiny cold spring in Massachusetts.  He then studied salt marshes at University of Georgia Marine Institute at Sapelo Island.  After four years, he went to Dalhousie University in Halifax at the new oceanography establishment in eastern Canada.  Dr.Teal joined Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in 1961 and has been Scientist Emeritus since 1995. In addition to research on coastal wetlands he has worked on physiology of large, warm blooded fishes, bird migration over the oceans, oil pollution, and wastewater treatment by wetlands.  He has been involved since 1993 in a salt marsh restoration project in Delaware Bay that encompasses 32 square miles.  He served on the Louisiana Coastal Area (LCA) scientific advisory committee for the Mississippi delta.  Dr. Teal has served on National Academy committees, Federal advisory committees, editorial boards of scientific journals, published in both the scientific and popular literature, and served on local committees.  Always interested in the willingness and/or unwillingness of professional scientists to take part in public policy decisions, Dr. Teal has served on the board of the Conservation Law Foundation of New England since 1978 and is now Trustee Emeritus.  He was president of the Society of Wetland Scientists in 1998-9.>/p>


2013 Awards

David F. Ludwig is a scientist, teacher, writer and naturalist with expertise in various disciplines of environmental science, and the study and management of ecosystems. Dr. Ludwig is a systems ecologist by training, with particular interest in marine/estuarine ecosystems, invertebrate biology, urban ecology, and risk/impact assessment. He obtained his Ph.D in Ecology from the University of Georgia in 1985, an M.A. degree in Marine Ecology from the Virginia Institute of Marine Sciences, College of William and Mary in 1982, and a B.S. degree in Environmental Science from Rutgers University in New Jersey in 1976. Dr. Ludwig has worked in both government and the private sector and has been an environmental consultant for the past 27 years. He currently works for ARCADIS, a large interdisciplinary sciences and engineering firm providing consulting services throughout the world. In this role, he has traveled and consulted extensively on a wide range of environmental projects/issues in North America, Europe, the Middle East and the Far East. Dr. Ludwig also serves as the Director of AEHS’s Online Professional Education Forum where he designs and teaches a variety of courses in ecological impact assessment and environmental management, and serves on the Editorial Board for the Foundation’s journals. He also teaches a course in Ecological Risk Assessment at the University of Maryland, and various courses on environmental management at scientific conferences and symposiums. Throughout his career, Dr. Ludwig has published extensively on a wide range of environmental and global sustainability issues, including many editorial pieces for AEHS, as well as articles for peer review journals, books and book chapters. He co-authored books on topics as diverse as the biology, ecology and toxicology of the true vipers, and the historical ecology of urban ecosystems—the latter chronicling the environmental impacts of anthropogenic activities to the lower Passaic River in northern New Jersey, a river that Dr. Ludwig lived near and fished in while growing up. David is, above all, a true family man. He lives in Columbia, Maryland with Cathy, his wife of 31 years. He has 3 children, Molly (age 25), Jesse (age 23) and Colin (age 20), all of whom share Dave’s passion for travel, literature, ecology, music and cooking. Dave fittingly works in a small office in a marina in downtown Annapolis, looking out over a harbor. In his role with ARCADIS, he continues to mentor and teach staff, both young and old, and he helps develop and foster initiatives in biodiversity and sustainable global environmental solutions.
 


Barbara G. Callahan, PhD has had technical oversight of public health and environmental risk assessments conducted by a number of risk assessment groups associated with international corporations. A recognized expert in her field, Dr. Callahan has worked in the environmental industry for much of a professional career that spans more than two decades. Dr. Callahan is a Diplomate of the American Board of Toxicology, former officer of the risk assessment subsection of the Society of Toxicology, sits on the United States Army Peer Review Committee on Toxicology as an expert on the neurotoxic effects of chemical warfare agents, was a member of the National Academy of Sciences Chemical and Biological Defense Command committee, is Co-Editor in Chief of the Journal of NonLinearity in Biology, Toxicology and Medicine (now Dose-Response, online), and lectured at Northeastern University as an Adjunct Professor of Risk Assessment and Regulatory Toxicology from 1990 to 1996. She was an Adjunct Professor at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, 2004-2008 and is now preparing an online course in chemical warfare agents. She holds degrees in Biology, Chemistry, and Toxicology and has experience in both public and private sector risk assessments. Dr. Callahan is a member of several national committees that study the effects of acute exposure to toxicants on human health after accidental release under emergency conditions. She has been awarded the US Army Environmental Hygiene Agency Commander's Medallion. Her specialized skill areas include: quantitative risk assessment, emergency response planning, risk communication, litigation support, and expert testimony. She is a member of the US Army Peer Review Committee on Toxicology, the Dose-Response Steering Committee and the Massachusetts Dept. of Environmental Protection (MADEP) committee on Health Effects. Dr. Callahan was responsible for technical oversight of the majority of public health and environmental risk assessments conducted by IT Corporation. She has, in addition, held positions at Groundwater Technology Inc., Fluor Daniel GTI, Gradient Corporation, Chevron Environmental Health Center and MA Department of Environmental Protection. Presently she is senior toxicologist for University Research.

2012 Awards

Dr. Samuel M. Cohen (M.D., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin – Madison, 1972) completed a residency in anatomic and clinical pathology at St. Vincent Hospital, Worcester, MA (1975), and became board certified the following year. He was visiting professor at Nagoya City University Medical School, Nagoya, Japan, 1976 – 1977, staff pathologist at St. Vincent Hospital, 1975 – 1981, and associate professor of pathology at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, 1977 – 1981. He has been professor of pathology and microbiology (vice chairman, 1981 – 1992; chairman, 1992 – 2007) and the Eppley Cancer Center at the University of Nebraska Medical Center since 1981. Dr. Cohen’s research has focused on mechanisms of carcinogenesis, with a focus on the role of cell proliferation in the carcinogenic process, primarily utilizing the urinary bladder as a model system. Most recently this has involved investigations into the mechanisms of bladder carcinogenesis produced by arsenicals and PPAR agonists. In addition, his research has involved clinical investigations of various aspects of urologic pathology and extrapolation between animals and humans. This research has resulted in more than 300 publications. He has been a member of numerous NIH, EPA, FDA, WHO, IARC, NTP and NAS study sections and scientific panels and is a member of the NIEHS Board of Scientific Counselors. He is associate editor or on editorial boards of five scientific journals in toxicology, pathology, and carcinogenesis, and is a reviewer for several other journals. He was president of the Carcinogenesis Specialty Section and the Central States Chapter of the Society of Toxicology (SOT). He received the University of Wisconsin Medical School Distinguished Alumnus Citation (1999), Arnold J. Lehman Award from SOT in 2001, named Distinguished Scientist in Cancer Research by the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research in 2004, and received the George H. Scott Award from Toxicology Forum in 2012. He continues to be active in human surgical pathology and was named as one of the “Best Doctors in America.”

Wayne Landis, Western Washington University. Since 1989, Dr. Landis has been the Director of the Institute of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, part of Huxley College of the Environment at Western Washington University.  Wayne Landis is a graduate of Wake Forest University with a BA in Biology in 1974.  He received an MA and a Ph.D. in Zoology from Indiana University in 1978 and 1979, respectively. Prior to his university experience he was a toxicologist for the Chemical Research Defense and Engineering Center at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. He has authored over 130 publications and 300 scientific presentations. Dr. Landis has served on a number of USEPA and other committees and consulted for industry; NG0s; print and electronic media; and federal (U.S. and Canada), state, provincial, and local governments. In 2007 he was selected as a Fellow of the Society for Risk Analysis. Dr. Landis has had a varied research program.  During the 1980s and early 1990s he discovered and characterized enzymes that degrade organophosphates, and bacteria that metabolize riot control materials. He also conducted an extensive research program using microcosms to investigate the effects of jet fuels and other materials on the dynamics of ecological structures. Using patch dynamics models he also formulated the theory of how to incorporate landscape scale effects as part of environmental toxicology.  He is the co-development of the Community Conditioning Hypothesis, and the Action at a Distance Hypothesis.  Currently his efforts have been to apply ecological risk assessment at regional and landscape scales using the relative risk model.  The use of the relative risk model has now been applied to contaminated sites, invasive species, forestry and species conservation and has been used across the world.


2011 Awards

Dr. Dale Hattis is a Research Professor with the George Perkins Marsh Institute at Clark University. For the past thirty five years he has been engaged in the development and application of methodology to assess the health, ecological, and economic impacts of regulatory actions. Recent research has involved quantitative analysis of uncertainties for cancer and non-cancer health risks of dioxin in pregnant women and their newborns. He is a leader in efforts to replace the current system of uncertainty factors with distributions based on empirical observations. He holds a Ph.D. in genetics from Stanford University and a B.A. in biochemistry from the University of California at Berkeley.
 
 
 
 
 
Dr. Charles A. Menzie received his Ph.D. from the City University of New York in 1978. He began consulting work in 1971 and formed Menzie- Cura in 1983 where he served as president. In 2006 he joined Exponent where he is currently Director of Ecological and Biological Sciences. His primary area of expertise is the environmental fate and effects of physical, biological, and chemical stressors on terrestrial and aquatic systems. Dr. Menzie is recognized as one of the leaders in the field of environmental risk assessment. Christopher T. De Rosa, ALPHA, Inc. (Government) Ian T. Osgerby, Retired from US Army Corps of Engineer  (Military)




2010 Awards

David R. Brown, Sc.D. lives in Westport, Connecticut. He is a graduate of Cornell University (B.S.), The University of California at Berkeley (MS) in Environmental Health and of the Harvard School of Public Health, Sc.D. Physiology/Toxicology. Married, he has two children and three grandchildren. Dr. Brown is founding member of Environment and Human Health Inc and an adjunct faculty member of the Applied Ethics Department at Fairfield University in Fairfield Connecticut where he teaches courses in Ethics and the Environment. David Brown is a Public Health Toxicologist who has worked in Academic, the Public and Private sectors. He is past Chief of Environmental Epidemiology and Occupational Health in the Connecticut Department of Health and previously was Associate Professor of Toxicology at Northeastern University, College of Pharmacy and Allied Health. He has served as Deputy Director of The Public Health Practice Group of ATSDR at the National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Georgia and as a consulting toxicologist with the North East States for Coordinated Air Use Management (NESCAUM). He is presently Director of Public Health Toxicology at Environment and Human Health Inc. Dr. Brown is a founding board member of Environment and Human Health Inc, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the protecting public health from environmental harms through research, education and promotion of sound public policy. Dr. Brown has extensive research in Toxicology and in Risk Assessment, Most recently he has written editorials and reports that address the ethical implication of regional and national environmental public health policy decisions. Dr Brown’s current research is focused on reduction of childhood exposures to toxics in air, water and in consumer products. He founded the toxicology programs at The University of Maryland School of Pharmacy and at Northeastern University. His early research focused on the effects of heavy metals on the development of the nervous system.

Stephen S. Koenigsberg, Ph.D. is Vice President of The Adventus Group in Irvine, California. He has 25 years of environmental remediation experience and is a recognized developer of widely used products and technologies. In addition to continuing in these activities for Adventus, Koenigsberg specializes in the emergent field of expedited site closure. This practice helps define a novel vendor model whereby product recommendations are integrated with suggestions for the use of molecular biological and isotopic diagnostics. This synergy can guide the formation of optimized site management and closure strategies and supports the consultant’s role in achieving cost-effective results for their clients. Koenigsberg was a Founder of Regenesis in 1994, where he co-invented and developed the company’s products through 2006; they have been applied to over 15,000 sites world-wide. One of the products, MRC®, received a Second Place Award from the Wall Street Journal for Technology Innovation in 2004. Before joining Adventus, Koenigsberg was a Principal at ENVIRON International Corporation. Dr. Koenigsberg has worked as a project team member on numerous sites involving in-situ and on-site treatment protocols and has published over 150 technical articles focusing on bioremediation and environmental biotechnology. Koenigsberg receivedhis M.S. and Ph.D from Cornell University. He is a member of several editorial and advisory Boards and is an adjunct professor at The California State University at Fullerton where he also serves as Chairman of the Dean’s Advisory Council.

Glenn W. Suter II is Science Advisor in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National Center for Environmental Assessment-Cincinnati. He has a Ph.D. in Ecology from the University of California, Davis, and 32 years of professional experience including 27 years of experience in ecological risk assessment and ecological epidemiology. He is the principal author of three texts in the field of ecological risk assessment, editor of three other books and author of more than two hundred other publications. He is Associate Editor for Ecological Risk of Human and Ecological Risk Assessment, and Reviews Editor for the Society for Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC). He has served on the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis Task Force on Risk and Policy Analysis, the Board of Directors of SETAC, an Expert Panel for the Council on Environmental Quality, and the editorial boards of five journals. He is the recipient of numerous awards and honors; most notably, he is an Elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science; and he received SETAC’s Global Founder’s Award, their award for career achievement, and the EPA’s Level 1 Scientific and Technical Achievement Award. His research experience includes development and application of methods for ecological risk assessment and ecological epidemiology, development of soil microcosm and fish toxicity tests, and environmental monitoring. His work is currently focused on the development of methods for determining the causes of biological impairments.

Leslie A. Karr, P.E. is a graduate of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, with an MS in Environmental Engineering and a BS in Biological Sciences. She began her Federal career working at the Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory (now known as the Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center) in Port Hueneme, CA as a Research Environmental Engineer. Over the past 30 years she has been the principle investigator for numerous projects, including Beneficial Reuse of Dredged sediments, Leak Detection for Bulk USTs & ASTs, Hydrocarbon National Test Site, Depleted Uranium Characterization on test ranges, Long-term Disposition of Seafloor Cables and the Defense Coastal/ Estuarine Research Program. She was a past recipient of the SAME Engineer of the Year, the NFESC Engineer of the Year, and the NAVFACENGCOM Engineer of the Year. Leslie currently serves as the Program Director for the Navy Environmental Sustainability Development to Integration (NESDI) research program, sponsored by the Chief of Naval Operations. NESDI is the Navy’s RDT&E program for shoreside environmental compliance, pollution prevention, cleanup, conservation, range sustainability, and port operations.



2009 Awards
Deborah A Cory-Slechta, UMDNJ and Rutgers University (Academic)
Barbara Beck, Gradient Corporation (Industry)
John T Wilson, R.S. Kerr Research Center (Government)
Thomas Jenkins, USACE Engineer Research and Development Center (Military)

2008 Awards
Raymond S Yang, Colorado State University (Academic)
James Dragun, Dragun Corporation (Industry)
Ann Marie Jarabek, US EPA (Government)
Wade Weisman, US Air Force (Military)

2007 Awards
Derek R Lovley, UMass (Academic)
Rosalind A. Schoof , ENVIRON (Industry)
John P Christopher, ??? (Government)
Charles M. Reynolds, USACE CRREL (Military)
 
2006 Awards
Paul C. Johnson, University of Arizona (Academic)
George M. Rusch, Honeywell International (Industry)
Annetta Watson, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Government)

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